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Indoor Long Exposure

I first learned how to light paint by Sister Esplin while I was at Bannack and ever since then I’ve loved the concept. I just love how you can take pictures of objects in the complete dark then paint light on them with a flash light. There’s definitely an art behind it because you want to make sure that you paint light on the right thing but you also don’t want to have too much light painted on them. You also have to make sure that you don’t shine the flash light towards the camera or else you will get light streaks. It takes a few shots to get the right picture but it’s so worth it.

As for the process, it’s basically everything I’ve already mentioned. I’ll describe the camera settings though. When doing light painting, you want to have a low ISO of 100 because the light will come from the flash light. You’ll also want a low aperture of about 8, I had mine at 11 because my pictures were really dark. Then I had a 15 second timer on so I could have enough time to paint light on the objects.

If you’re interested in doing some light painting of your own, check out this tutorial http://digital-photography-school.com/light-painting-part-one-the-photography/